Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Spanish translation of “industry”

industry

noun /ˈindəstri/ (plural industries)
(any part of) the business of producing or making goods
industria
the ship-building industry The government should invest more money in industry.
hard work or effort
diligencia
He owed his success to both ability and industry.
industrial /-ˈdas/ adjective having, concerning etc industries or the making of goods
industrial
That area of the country is industrial rather than agricultural.
industrialist /-ˈdas-/ noun a person who takes part in the running of a large industrial organization a wealthy industrialist. industrialized /-ˈdas/ adjective ( (also industrialisedBritish)) (of a country) having a large number of industries
industrializado
the industrialized nations.
industrialization noun ( (also industrialisationBritish))
industrialización
industrious /-ˈdas-/ adjective busy and hard-working
trabajador, laborioso
industrious pupils.
industrial action noun action taken by workers, especially a strike, when they are protesting against their employers
huelga
The union is threatening industrial action over a pay dispute.
industrial estate noun an area of a town etc set aside for (the building of) factories.
polígono/zona industrial
industrial relations noun plural the relationship between the management and the workers in a factory etc.
relaciones empresariales
(Definition of industry from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Browse related topics

You are looking at an entry to do with Work, working and the workplace, but you might be interested in these topics from the Working topic area:

Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

More translations of “industry” in Spanish

Definitions of “industry” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

shadow

an area of darkness, caused by light being blocked by something

Word of the Day

Highly delighted, bitterly disappointed, ridiculously cheap: adverbs for emphasis.

by Liz Walter,
October 22, 2014
We often make adjectives stronger by putting an adverb in front of them. The most common ones are very and, for a stronger meaning, extremely: He was very pleased. The ship is extremely large. However, we don’t use very or extremely for adjectives that already have a strong meaning, for example fantastic,

Read More 

life tracking noun

October 20, 2014
the use of one or more devices or apps to monitor health, exercise, how time is spent, etc.

Read More