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Spanish translation of “intend”

intend

verb /inˈtend/
to mean or plan (to do something or that someone else should do something)
tener la intención de, querer
Do you still intend to go? Do you intend them to go? Do you intend that they should go too?
to mean (something) to be understood in a particular way
pretender, querer decir
His remarks were intended to be a compliment.
(with for) to direct at
ir dirigido a
That letter/bullet was intended for me.
intent /-t/ adjective (with on) meaning, planning or wanting to do (something)
decidido, resuelto, que tiene intención de
He’s intent on going He’s intent on marrying the girl.
(with on) concentrating hard on
absorto
She was intent on the job she was doing.
intention /-ʃən/ noun what a person plans or intends to do
intención
He has no intention of leaving He went to see the boss with the intention of asking for a pay rise If I have offended you, it was quite without intention Despite all his good intentions, he couldn’t cheer her up.
intentional /-ʃənl/ adjective (opposite unintentional) done, said etc deliberately and not by accident
intencional
I’m sorry I offended you – it wasn’t intentional an intentional act of violence.
intentionally adverb
intencionalmente
He intentionally misled her.
intently adverb with great concentration
atentamente
He was watching her intently.
(Definition of intend from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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