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Translation of "introduce" - English-Spanish dictionary

introduce

verb   /ˌɪn·trəˈdjuːs/ ( present participle introducing, past tense and past participle introduced)
B1 to tell someone another person’s name the first time that they meet presentar He took me around the room and introduced me to everyone.
to make something exist or happen for the first time introducir We have introduced a new training scheme for employees.
(Definition of introduce from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

introduce

verb /intrəˈdjuːs/
(often with to) to make (people) known by name to each other presentar He introduced the guests (to each other) Let me introduce you to my mother May I introduce myself? I’m John Brown.
(often with into) to bring in (something new) introducir Grey squirrels were introduced into Britain from Canada Why did you introduce such a boring subject (into the conversation)?
to propose or put forward presentar He introduced a bill in Parliament for the abolition of income tax.
(with to) to cause (a person) to get to know (a subject etc) iniciar en Children are introduced to algebra at about the age of eleven.
introduction /-ˈdakʃən/ noun
the act of introducing, or the process of being introduced introducción the introduction of new methods.
an act of introducing one person to another presentación The hostess made the introductions and everyone shook hands.
something written at the beginning of a book explaining the contents, or said at the beginning of a speech etc. introducción, prefacio
introductory /-ˈdaktəri/ adjective
giving an introduction introductorio He made a few introductory remarks about the film before the screening.
(Definition of introduce from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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