Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Spanish translation of “jump”

See all translations

jump

verb /dʒamp/
to (cause to) go quickly off the ground with a springing movement
saltar
He jumped off the wall / across the puddle / over the fallen tree / into the swimming-pool Don’t jump the horse over that fence!
to rise; to move quickly (upwards)
saltar
She jumped to her feet He jumped into the car.
to make a startled movement
saltar; sobresaltar(se)
The noise made me jump.
to pass over (a gap etc) by bounding
saltar
He jumped the stream easily.
jumpy adjective nervous; easily upset
nervioso
He has been very jumpy and irritable lately.
jump at phrasal verb to take or accept eagerly
aceptar sin pensarlo
He jumped at the chance to go to Germany for a fortnight.
jump for joy to show great pleasure
saltar de alegría
He jumped for joy when Brazil scored.
jump on phrasal verb to make a sudden attack on
saltar encima de
He was waiting round the corner and jumped on me in the dark.
jump the gun to start before the proper time
precipitarse
We shouldn’t be going on holiday till tomorrow, but we jumped the gun and caught today’s last flight.
jump the queue to move ahead of others in a queue without waiting for one’s proper turn
colarse
Many wealthy or important people try to jump the queue for hospital beds.
jump to conclusions / jump to the conclusion that to form an idea without making sure of the facts
llegar a conclusiones precipitadas
He saw my case in the hall and jumped to the conclusion that I was leaving.
jump to it to hurry up
apurarse, salir corriendo/pitando, aligerar
If you don’t jump to it, you’ll miss the train.
(Definition of jump from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “jump” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

glacial

made or left by a glacier

Word of the Day

Let’s celebrate! (words and phrases for parties)

by Kate Woodford,
December 17, 2014
​​​ With Christmas and New Year almost upon us, we thought it a good time to look at the language of parties and celebrations. First, let’s start with the word ‘party’ itself. To have or throw a party or, less commonly, to give a party is to arrange a party: We’re having a

Read More 

cinderella surgery noun

December 15, 2014
cosmetic surgery to the feet We have all heard of people having nose jobs, boob jobs and liposuction – but now a new trend growing in popularity in America: Cinderella surgery.

Read More