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Spanish translation of “just”

just

adverb /dʒast/
(often with as) exactly or precisely
exactamente
This penknife is just what I needed He was behaving just as if nothing had happened The house was just as I’d remembered it.
(with as) equally
exactamente
This dress is just as nice as that one.
very lately or recently
acabar de, ahora mismo, hace un momento
He has just gone out of the house.
on the point of; in the process of
en este momento
She is just coming through the door.
at the particular moment
justo, en el mismo instante/momento en que
The telephone rang just as I was leaving.
(often with only) barely
a penas
We have only just enough milk to last till Friday I just managed to escape You came just in time.
only; merely
sólamente
They waited for six hours just to get a glimpse of the Queen ’Where are you going?’ ’Just to the post office Could you wait just a minute?
used for emphasis, eg with commands
¡pero!; de verdad
Just look at that mess! That just isn’t true! I just don’t know what to do.
absolutely
absolutamente
The weather is just marvellous.
just about more or less
más o menos
That’s just about the right amount of flour for this recipe.
just now at this particular moment
en este momento
I can’t do it just now.
a short while ago
hace un momento
She fell and banged her head just now, but she feels better again.
just then at that particular moment
en ese momento
He was feeling rather hungry just then.
in the next minute
en ese momento
She opened the letter and read it. Just then the door bell rang.
(Definition of just from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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