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Translation of "just" - English-Spanish dictionary

just

adverb /dʒast/
(often with as) exactly or precisely exactamente This penknife is just what I needed He was behaving just as if nothing had happened The house was just as I’d remembered it.
(with as) equally exactamente This dress is just as nice as that one.
very lately or recently acabar de, ahora mismo, hace un momento He has just gone out of the house.
on the point of; in the process of en este momento She is just coming through the door.
at the particular moment justo, en el mismo instante/momento en que The telephone rang just as I was leaving.
(often with only) barely a penas We have only just enough milk to last till Friday I just managed to escape You came just in time.
only; merely sólamente They waited for six hours just to get a glimpse of the Queen ’Where are you going?’ ’Just to the post office Could you wait just a minute?
used for emphasis, eg with commands ¡pero!; de verdad Just look at that mess! That just isn’t true! I just don’t know what to do.
absolutely absolutamente The weather is just marvellous.
just about
more or less más o menos That’s just about the right amount of flour for this recipe.
just now
at this particular moment en este momento I can’t do it just now.
a short while ago hace un momento She fell and banged her head just now, but she feels better again.
just then
at that particular moment en ese momento He was feeling rather hungry just then.
in the next minute en ese momento She opened the letter and read it. Just then the door bell rang.
(Definition of just from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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