leisure translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "leisure" - English-Spanish dictionary

leisure

noun /ˈleʒə, (American) ˈliːʒər/
time which one can spend as one likes, especially when one does not have to work
ocio, tiempo libre
She leads a life of leisure. (also adjective) Ursula enjoys reading and gardening in her leisure time.
leisurely adjective, adverb not hurrying; taking plenty of time
sin prisa, relajado, pausado
She had a leisurely bath.
Translations of “leisure”
in Arabic وَقْت الفَراغ…
in Korean 여가…
in Malaysian masa lapang…
in French loisir…
in Turkish boş vakit…
in Italian tempo libero…
in Chinese (Traditional) 空閒,閒暇,休閒…
in Russian досуг, свободное время…
in Polish czas wolny, rekreacja…
in Vietnamese thời gian rỗi…
in Portuguese lazer…
in Thai เวลาว่าง…
in German die Freizeit…
in Catalan lleure…
in Japanese 自由時間…
in Indonesian waktu senggang…
in Chinese (Simplified) 空闲,闲暇,休闲…
(Definition of leisure from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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