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Spanish translation of “look”

look

verb /luk/
to turn the eyes in a certain direction so as to see, to find, to express etc
mirar
He looked out of the window I’ve looked everywhere, but I can’t find him He looked at me (angrily).
to seem
parecer
It looks as if it’s going to rain She looks sad.
to face
dar a
The house looks west.
look-alike noun a person who looks (exactly) like someone else; a double
doble
the prince’s look-alike.
-looking having a certain appearance
de aspecto
good-looking strange-looking.
looks noun plural (attractive) appearance
atractivos
She lost her looks as she grew older good looks.
looker-on noun a person who is watching something happening; onlooker
espectador, observador
looking-glass noun (old-fashioned) a mirror.
espejo
lookout noun a careful watch
observación, vigilancia
Keep a sharp lookout for Jim
a place from which such a watch can be kept.
atalaya
a person who has been given the job of watching
vigilante, centinela
There was a shout from the lookout.
concern, responsibility
asunto
If he catches you leaving early, that’s your lookout!
by the look(s) of judging from the appearance of (someone or something) it seems likely or probable
por lo visto
By the looks of him, he won’t live much longer It’s going to rain by the look of it.
look after phrasal verb to attend to or take care of
cuidar, ocuparse de
She gave up her job to look after the children.
look ahead phrasal verb to consider what will happen in the future
mirar hacia adelante, mirar el futuro
Let’s have a look ahead to tomorrow’s tennis final.
look down one’s nose at to regard with contempt
mirar a alguien mal
She looks down her nose at poor people.
look down on phrasal verb to regard as inferior
despreciar
She looks down on her husband’s relations.
look for phrasal verb to search for
buscar algo
I’ve been looking for that book everywhere.
look forward to phrasal verb to wait with pleasure for
esperar con interés
I am looking forward to seeing you / to the holidays.
look here! give your attention to this
¡mira!
Look here! Isn’t that what you wanted? Look here, Mary, you’re being unfair!
look in on phrasal verb to visit briefly
visitar
I decided to look in on Paul and Carol on my way home.
look into phrasal verb to inspect or investigate closely
investigar
The manager will look into your complaint.
look on phrasal verb to watch something
mirar
No, I don’t want to play – I’d rather look on.
(with as) to think of or consider
considerar
I have lived with my aunt since I was a baby, and I look on her as my mother.
look out phrasal verb (usually with for) to watch
observar, fijarse
She was looking out for him from the window.
to find by searching
buscar
I’ve looked out these books for you.
look out! phrasal verb beware! take care!
¡cuidado!
Look out! There’s a car coming!
look over phrasal verb to examine
examinar, echar una ojeada
We have been looking over the new house.
look through phrasal verb to look at or study briefly
revisar
I’ve looked through your report.
look up phrasal verb to improve
mejorar
Things have been looking up lately.
to pay a visit to
visitar, ir a ver
I looked up several old friends.
to search for in a book of reference
buscar
You should look the word up (in a dictionary).
look up to phrasal verb to respect the conduct, opinions etc of
respetar
He has always looked up to his father.
(Definition of look from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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