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Translation of "manage" - English-Spanish dictionary

manage

verb   /ˈmæn·ɪdʒ/ ( present participle managing, past tense and past participle managed)
B1 to do something that you have been trying to do lograr I managed to persuade him to come.
B1 to be in control of an office, shop, team, etc. administrar He used to manage the bookshop on King Street.
(Definition of manage from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

manage

verb /ˈmӕnidʒ/
to be in control or charge of dirigir, llevar, administrar My lawyer manages all my legal affairs/money.
to be manager of administrar, llevar James manages the local football team.
to deal with, or control llevar, manejar She’s good at managing people.
to be able to do something; to succeed or cope conseguir, lograr Will you manage to repair your bicycle? Can you manage (to eat) some more meat?
manageable adjective
(opposite unmanageable)
that can be controlled tratable, dócil The children are not very manageable.
that can be done manejable Are you finding this work manageable?
manageability noun
manejo fácil The manageability of the project must also be taken into consideration.
management noun
the art of managing dirección, administración, gestión an old-fashioned style of management The management of this company is a difficult task.
or noun plural the managers of a firm etc as a group junta directiva, consejo de administración The management has/have agreed to pay the workers more.
manager noun ( feminine manageress)
a person who is in charge of eg a business, football team etc director, gerente; directora, gerenta the manager of the new store.
managerial noun
relating to the job of a manager directivo, gerencial a managerial decision/position/responsibility.
(Definition of manage from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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