money translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "money" - English-Spanish dictionary

money

noun /ˈmani/
coins or banknotes used in trading
dinero
Have you any money in your purse? The desire for money is a cause of much unhappiness.
money-box noun a box for saving money in.
hucha
moneylender noun a person who lends money and charges interest.
prestamista
lose/make money to make a loss or a profit
perder/ganar dinero
This film is making a lot of money in America.
Translations of “money”
in Arabic نُقود…
in Korean 돈…
in Malaysian wang…
in French argent…
in Turkish para, nakit…
in Italian denaro, soldi…
in Chinese (Traditional) 貨幣, 錢,金錢, 財產…
in Russian деньги…
in Polish pieniądze…
in Vietnamese tiền…
in Portuguese dinheiro…
in Thai เงิน…
in German das Geld…
in Catalan diners…
in Japanese お金…
in Indonesian uang…
in Chinese (Simplified) 货币, 钱,金钱, 财产…
(Definition of money from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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