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Translation of "mother" - English-Spanish dictionary

mother

noun   /ˈmʌð·ər/
A1 someone’s female parent madre My mother and father are divorced.
a name used by a woman’s child. Saying ‘mother’ is more formal than saying ‘mum’. madre How are you feeling today, Mother?
(Definition of mother from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

mother

noun /ˈmaðə/
a female parent, especially human madre John’s mother lives in Manchester (also adjective) The mother bird feeds her young.
(often with capital madre also Mother Superior) the female leader of a group of nuns.
motherboard noun
(computing) the main circuit board in a computer or other device placa base Instructions on how to disassemble the computer and replace the motherboard should be in the Hardware Maintenance Manual.
motherhood noun
the state of being a mother maternidad She gave up her career for motherhood.
motherless adjective
having no mother huérfano de madre The children were left motherless by the accident.
motherly adjective
like a mother; of, or suitable to, a mother maternal a motherly woman motherly love.
motherliness noun
maternalismo, instinto maternal
mother country /-land/ noun ( plural mother countries) ( motherland)
the country where one was born. patria, madre patria
mother-in-law noun ( plural mothers-in-law)
the mother of one’s husband or wife. suegra
mother-of-pearl noun, adjective
(of) the shining, hard, smooth substance on the inside of certain shells. madreperla, nácar
Mother’s Day noun
a special day on which people give cards and presents to their mothers. día de la madre
mother tongue noun
a person’s native language lengua materna My mother tongue is Spanish.
(Definition of mother from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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