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Spanish translation of “much”

much

adjective /matʃ/ (comparative more /moː/, superlative most /moust/)
a (great) amount or quantity of
mucho
This job won’t take much effort I found it without much difficulty How much sugar is there left? There’s far too much salt in my soup He ate so much ice-cream that he was sick Take as much money as you need After much discussion they decided to go.
be not much of a to be not a very good thing of a particular kind
no ser muy bueno en
I’m not much of a photographer That wasn’t much of a lecture.
be not up to much to be not very good
no valer gran cosa
The dinner wasn’t up to much.
be too much for to overwhelm; to be too difficult etc for
ser demasiado para
Is the job too much for you?
make much of to make a fuss of (a person) or about (a thing)
dar mucha importancia a algo
The player was making much of slight injury in order to waste time.
to make sense of; to understand
comprender, entender
I couldn’t make much of the film.
much as although
por mucho que
Much as I should like to come, I can’t.
much the same not very different
más o menos igual
The patient’s condition is still much the same.
nothing much nothing important, impressive etc
nada en especial
’What are you doing?’ ’Nothing much.’
not much nothing important, impressive etc
poco
My car isn’t much to look at, but it’s fast.
so much for that’s all that can be said about
se acabó, no es para tanto
So much for that – let’s talk about something else He arrived half an hour late – so much for his punctuality!
think too much of to have too high an opinion of
tener una gran opinión de
He thinks too much of himself.
without so much as without even
sin siquiera
He took my umbrella without so much as asking.
see also many.
(Definition of much from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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