nest translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "nest" - English-Spanish dictionary

nest

noun /nest/
a structure or place in which birds (and some animals and insects) hatch or give birth to and look after their young
nido
The swallows are building a nest under the roof of our house a wasp’s nest.
nestling /-liŋ/ noun a young bird (still in the nest).
pajarito
nest-egg noun a sum of money saved up for the future.
ahorros
Translations of “nest”
in Arabic عُش…
in Korean 둥지…
in Malaysian sarang…
in French nid…
in Turkish kuş yuvası, yuva…
in Italian nido…
in Chinese (Traditional) 家, (鳥類或昆蟲的)窩,巢, (某些動物的)穴…
in Russian гнездо…
in Polish gniazdo…
in Vietnamese tổ chim…
in Portuguese ninho…
in Thai รังนก…
in German das Nest…
in Catalan niu…
in Japanese (鳥などの)巣…
in Indonesian sarang…
in Chinese (Simplified) 家, (鸟类或昆虫的)窝,巢, 某些动物的穴…
(Definition of nest from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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