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Spanish translation of “opinion”

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opinion

noun /əˈpinjən/
what a person thinks or believes
opinión
My opinions about education have changed.
a (professional) judgement, usually of a doctor, lawyer etc
opinión
He wanted a second opinion on his illness.
what one thinks of the worth or value of someone or something
opinión
I have a very high opinion of his work.
opinionated adjective (disapproving) having very strong opinions that you are unwilling to change
obstinado
He can be very opinionated when it comes to politics.
opinion poll noun the process of finding out what people in general think about a subject by questioning people who are representative of a larger group
encuesta de opinión, sondeo de opinión
The opinion poll suggests that the party will do better than it did in the last general election.
be of the opinion (that) to think
opinar que
He is of the opinion that nothing more can be done.
in my ( your etc opinion) according to what I, you etc think
en mi/tu etc opinión
In my opinion, he’s right.
a matter of opinion noun something about which different people (may) have different opinions
ser discutible
Whether it is better to marry young or not is a matter of opinion.
Translations of “opinion”
in Korean 의견, 여론…
in Arabic رأي, رَأي…
in French opinion, avis…
in Italian opinione, parere…
in Chinese (Traditional) 意見, 看法, 主張…
in Russian мнение…
in Turkish fikir, düşünce, kanı…
in Polish opinia, pogląd, zdanie…
in Portuguese opinião…
in German die Meinung, das Gutachten…
in Catalan opinió…
in Japanese 意見, 世論…
in Chinese (Simplified) 意见, 看法, 主张…
(Definition of opinion from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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