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Translation of "pace" - English-Spanish dictionary

pace

noun [no plural]   /peɪs/
the speed at which someone walks or runs paso, ritmo We started to walk at a much faster pace.
a single step paso Take two paces forward/back. The runner collapsed just a few paces from the finish.2228239
verb   /peɪs/ ( present participle pacing, past tense and past participle paced)
to walk around because you are worried about something ir de un lado para otro (de) She was pacing up and down, waiting for the phone to ring.
(Definition of pace from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

pace

noun /peis/
a step paso He took a pace forward.
speed of movement paso a fast pace.
pacemaker noun
(medical) an electronic device to make the heart beats regular or stronger marcapasos He wears a heart pacemaker.
a person who sets the speed of a race. liebre
keep pace with
to go as fast as llevar el mismo paso, ir al mismo ritmo He kept pace with the car on his motorbike.
pace out phrasal verb
to measure by walking along, across etc with even steps medir a pasos She paced out the room.
put someone etc through his etc paces
to make someone etc show what he etc can do poner a alguien a prueba He put his new car through its paces.
set the pace
to go forward at a particular speed which everyone else has to follow marcar el paso; marcar la pauta Her experiments set the pace for future research.
show one’s paces
to show what one can do mostrar uno sus habilidades/talentos They made the horse show its paces.
(Definition of pace from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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