police - translate into Spanish with the English-Spanish dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Spanish translation of “police”

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police

noun plural /pəˈliːs/
the men and women whose job is to prevent crime, keep order, see that laws are obeyed etc
policía
Call the police! The police are investigating the matter (also adjective) the police force, a police officer.
police constable noun (in Britain) a police officer of the lowest rank
Oficial Policiaco del Menor Rango
police dog noun a dog trained to work with policemen (in tracking criminals, finding drugs etc.
perro policía
police force noun the police organization of a country or area
Fuerza Policial
She’s thinking of joining the police force when she leaves school.
policeman noun ( plural policemen, policewomen) ( policewoman) a member of the police.
policía, agente de policía
police officer noun a member of the police
Oficial de Policía
Two police officers arrested the man and put handcuffs on him.
police station noun the office or headquarters of a local police force
comisaría
The shoplifter was taken to the local police station.
Translations of “police”
in Arabic شُرْطة…
in Korean 경찰…
in Malaysian polis…
in French (de) police…
in Turkish polis teşkilâtı, emniyet güçleri…
in Italian polizia…
in Chinese (Traditional) 員警當局,警方, 員警…
in Russian полиция…
in Polish policja, Police ma tylko liczbę mnogą!…
in Vietnamese cảnh sát…
in Portuguese polícia…
in Thai ตำรวจ…
in German die Polizei, Polizei-……
in Catalan policia…
in Japanese 警察, 警察署…
in Indonesian polisi…
in Chinese (Simplified) 警察当局,警方, 警察…
(Definition of police from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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