process translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "process" - English-Spanish dictionary

process

noun /ˈprəuses, (American) ˈpro-/
a method or way of manufacturing things
proceso
We are using a new process to make glass.
a series of events that produce change or development
proceso
The process of growing up can be difficult for a child the digestive processes.
a course of action undertaken
operación
Carrying him down the mountain was a slow process.
processed adjective (of food) treated in a special way
procesado, tratado
processed cheese/peas.
processor noun a machine or person that processes things
Procesador
a food processor.
a company that treats something in order to make it ready to use
Procesador
a meat processor.
(computing ) a part of a computer that controls all the other parts; central processing unit
Procesador
The processor receives commands and handles them.
in the process of in the course of
estar haciendo algo, en vías de
He is in the process of changing jobs These goods were damaged in the process of manufacture.
(Definition of process from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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