rail translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary

Translation of "rail" - English-Spanish dictionary


noun /reil/
a (usually horizontal) bar of metal, wood etc used in fences etc, or for hanging things on
Don’t lean over the rail a curtain rail a towel rail.
(usually in plural ) a long bar of steel which forms the track on which trains etc run
carril, raíl
The accident occurred when the train came off the rails.
railing noun (usually in plural ) a fence or barrier of (usually vertical) metal or wooden bars
verja, enrejado
They’ve put railings up all round the park.
railroad noun (American) a railway.
railway noun (British ) a track with (usually more than one set of) two (or sometimes three) parallel steel rails on which trains run; railroad(American)
vía; línea de ferrocarril
They’re building a new railway (also adjective) a railway station.
(British ) (sometimes in plural ) the whole organization which is concerned with the running of trains, the building of tracks etc ; railroad(American)
He has a job on the railway The railways are very badly run in some countries.
by rail by or on the railway
por ferrocarril
goods sent by rail.
(Definition of rail from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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