receive translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "receive" - English-Spanish dictionary

receive

verb /rəˈsiːv/
to get or be given
recibir
He received a letter They received a good education.
to have a formal meeting with
recibir
The Pope received the Queen in the Vatican.
to allow to join something
recibir, acoger
He was received into the group.
to greet, react to, in some way
recibir, acoger
The news was received in silence The townspeople received the heroes with great cheers.
to accept (stolen goods) especially with the intention of reselling (them)
comerciar (con)
He was found guilty of receiving stolen goods.
receiver noun the part of a telephone which is held to one’s ear
auricular
She picked up the receiver.
an apparatus for receiving radio or television signals.
receptor
a person who receives stolen goods.
receptador, perista
a person who is appointed to take control of the business of someone who has gone bankrupt.
síndico (de quiebras)
a stereo amplifier with a built-in radio.
radiorreceptor
receive is spelt with -ei-.
(Definition of receive from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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