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Translation of "relax" - English-Spanish dictionary

relax

verb   /rɪˈlæks/
B1 to become happy and comfortable because nothing is worrying you, or to make someone do this relajarse I find it difficult to relax.
(Definition of relax from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

relax

verb /rəˈlӕks/
to make or become less tight or tense or less worried etc; to rest completely relajar(se) The doctor gave him a drug to make him relax Relax your shoulders He relaxed his grip for a second and the rope was dragged out of his hand.
to make or become less strict or severe relajar, suavizar The rules were relaxed because of the Queen’s visit.
relaxation /riːlӕks-/ noun
esparcimiento, diversión, distracción; relajación I play golf for relaxation Golf is one of my favourite relaxations.
relaxed /riˈlækst/ adjective
calm and not anxious Relajado He looked calm and relaxed as he answered the interviewer’s questions.
(of a place or situation) calm and informal Relajado Enjoy the relaxed atmosphere of this small restaurant.
not strict or caring too much about rules or discipline Relajado A recent survey of British parents revealed an increasingly relaxed attitude towards their own children engaging in drinking.
relaxing /riˈlæksiŋ/ adjective
helping you to rest and become less worried Relajada She spent a relaxing afternoon sunning herself by the pool.
(Definition of relax from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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