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Spanish translation of “repeat”

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repeat

verb /rəˈpiːt/
to say or do again
repetir
Would you repeat those instructions, please?
to say (something one has heard) to someone else, sometimes when one ought not to
repetir
Please do not repeat what I’ve just told you.
to say (something) one has learned by heart
recitar
The teacher asked her to repeat a poem.
repeated adjective said, done etc many times
repetido
In spite of repeated warnings, he went on smoking The judge said that he was very disturbed by a repeated pattern of criminal acts over a long period of time.
repeatedly adverb many times
repetidamente, muchas veces
I’ve asked him for it repeatedly.
repetition /repəˈtiʃən/ noun (an) act of repeating
repetición
repetition of a musical phrase.
repetitive /rəˈpetətiv/ adjective doing, saying, the same thing too often
repetitivo
His speeches are very repetitive My job is a bit repetitive.
repetitively adverb
de manera repetitiva
repetitiveness noun
repetitividad, cualidad de repetitivo
repeat oneself verb to repeat what one has already said
respetirse
Listen carefully because I don’t want to have to repeat myself.
to repeat (not repeat again) the lessons.
Translations of “repeat”
in Korean 반복하다…
in Arabic يُكَرِّر…
in French répéter, réciter…
in Italian ripetere…
in Chinese (Traditional) 重複, 重說, 重做…
in Russian повторять, рассказывать…
in Turkish tekrar etmek, yinelemek, tekrar söylemek…
in Polish powtarzać…
in Portuguese repetir…
in German wiederholen, weiter erzählen, aufsagen…
in Catalan repetir…
in Japanese ~を繰り返す, 反復する…
in Chinese (Simplified) 重复, 重说, 重做…
(Definition of repeat from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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