roll translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "roll" - English-Spanish dictionary

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roll

verb
to move on wheels, rollers etc
(hacer) rodar
The children rolled the cart up the hill, then let it roll back down again.
to form (a piece of paper, a carpet) into the shape of a tube by winding
enrollar
Help me to roll the carpet back.
(of a person or animal in a lying position) to turn over
dar(se) la vuelta
The doctor rolled the patient (over) on to his side The dog rolled on to its back.
to shape (clay etc) into a ball or cylinder by turning it about between the hands
moldear
He rolled the clay into a ball.
to cover with something by rolling
envolver, liar
When the little girl’s dress caught fire, they rolled her in a blanket.
to make (something) flat or flatter by rolling something heavy over it
alisar, allanar; estirar
The lawn needs rolling Roll the pastry (out) into a rectangle about 5mm thick..
(of a ship) to rock from side to side while travelling forwards
balancearse, mecerse
The storm made the ship roll.
to make a series of low sounds
retumbar; redoblar
The thunder rolled The drums rolled.
to move (one’s eyes) round in a circle to express fear, surprise etc
poner los ojos en blanco
She rolled her eyes in consternation.
to travel in a car etc
rodar, ir; viajar
We were rolling along merrily when a tyre burst.
(of waves, rivers etc) to move gently and steadily
ondular, fluir; romper
The waves rolled in to the shore.
(of time) to pass
pasar, sucederse
Months rolled by.
(Definition of roll from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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