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Spanish translation of “rose”

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rose

noun /rəuz/
a kind of brightly-coloured/-colored, usually sweet-scented flower, usually with sharp thorns.
rosa
(also adjective) (of) a pink colour/color
rosa
Her dress was pale rose.
rosette /rəˈzet, (American) rou-/ noun a badge or decoration in the shape of a rose, made of coloured/colored ribbon etc
escarapela
Her poodle won a rosette in the dog show.
rosy adjective ( comparative rosier, superlative rosiest) rose-coloured/-colored; pink
rosado
rosy cheeks.
bright; hopeful
brillante, prometedor
His future looks rosy.
rosily adverb
con tono rosado
rosiness noun
cualidad de rosado
rosefish noun North Atlantic rose-coloured/-colored fish used for food.
gallineta nórdica
rose hip noun the red fruit of a rose, which is rich in vitamin C.
escaramujo
rosewood noun, adjective (of) a dark wood used for making furniture
palo de rosa, palisandro
a rose wood cabinet.
look at / see through rose-coloured/-colored spectacles/glasses to take an over-optimistic view of
verlo todo color de rosa
She tends to look at the world through rose-coloured glasses.
Translations of “rose”
in Korean 장미…
in Arabic وَرْدة…
in French rose…
in Italian rosa…
in Chinese (Traditional) 植物, 玫瑰, 薔薇…
in Russian роза…
in Turkish gül…
in Polish róża…
in Portuguese rosa…
in German die Rose, das Rosarot, Rosarot-……
in Catalan rosa…
in Japanese バラ…
in Chinese (Simplified) 植物, 玫瑰, 蔷薇…
(Definition of rose from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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