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Spanish translation of “rose”

rose

noun /rəuz/
a kind of brightly-coloured/-colored, usually sweet-scented flower, usually with sharp thorns.
rosa
(also adjective) (of) a pink colour/color
rosa
Her dress was pale rose.
rosette /rəˈzet, (American) rou-/ noun a badge or decoration in the shape of a rose, made of coloured/colored ribbon etc
escarapela
Her poodle won a rosette in the dog show.
rosy adjective (comparative rosier, superlative rosiest) rose-coloured/-colored; pink
rosado
rosy cheeks.
bright; hopeful
brillante, prometedor
His future looks rosy.
rosily adverb
con tono rosado
rosiness noun
cualidad de rosado
rosefish noun North Atlantic rose-coloured/-colored fish used for food.
gallineta nórdica
rose hip noun the red fruit of a rose, which is rich in vitamin C.
escaramujo
rosewood noun, adjective (of) a dark wood used for making furniture
palo de rosa, palisandro
a rose wood cabinet.
look at / see through rose-coloured/-colored spectacles/glasses to take an over-optimistic view of
verlo todo color de rosa
She tends to look at the world through rose-coloured glasses.
(Definition of rose from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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