rough translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "rough" - English-Spanish dictionary

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rough

adjective /raf/
not smooth
áspero
Her skin felt rough.
uneven
accidentado
a rough path.
harsh; unpleasant
duro; brusco
a rough voice She’s had a rough time since her husband died.
noisy and violent
rudo; bruto; violento
rough behaviour.
stormy
turbulento; embravecido
The sea was rough rough weather.
not complete or exact; approximate
aproximativo, esbozado
a rough drawing a rough idea/estimate.
roughly adverb
ásperamente; rudamente; duramente
The older boys at school treated him very roughly.
roughness noun
aspereza; rudeza
roughage /-fidʒ/ noun substances in food, eg bran or fibre/fiber, which help digestion.
alimentos ricos en fibra
roughen verb to make or become rough
embravecerse
The sea roughened as the wind rose.
rough diamond noun a person of fine character but rough manners.
diamante en bruto
rough-and-ready adjective not carefully made or finished, but good enough
improvisado; rudimentario
a rough-and-ready meal.
(of people) friendly enough but without politeness etc.
campechano; tosco
rough-and-tumble noun friendly fighting between children etc
pelea en broma, riña sin importancia
the rough-and-tumble of bike racing.
rough it to live for a period of time without the comforts or conveniences of modern life
vivir sin comodidades
They roughed it in the jungle for two months.
rough out phrasal verb to draw or explain roughly
esbozar
I roughed out a diagram He roughed out his plan.
(Definition of rough from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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