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Translation of "salt" - English-Spanish dictionary

salt

noun /soːlt/
(also common salt) sodium chloride, a white substance frequently used for seasoning sal The soup needs more salt.
any other substance formed, like common salt, from a metal and an acid. sal
a sailor, especially an experienced one (viejo) lobo de mar an old salt.
salted adjective
(opposite unsalted) containing or preserved with salt salado salted butter salted beef.
saltness noun
salinidad; salobridad
salty adjective ( comparative saltier, superlative saltiest)
containing or tasting of salt salado Tears are salty water.
saltiness noun
salinidad; salobridad
bath salts noun plural
a usually perfumed mixture of certain salts added to bath water. sales de baño
the salt of the earth noun
a very good or worthy person valer su peso en oro, valer un Perú/Potosí, valer un imperio People like her are the salt of the earth.
take (something) with a grain/pinch of salt
to receive (a statement, news etc) with a slight feeling of disbelief escuchar con reservas I took his story with a pinch of salt.
(Definition of salt from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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