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Translation of "say" - English-Spanish dictionary

say

verb   /seɪ/ ( present participle saying, past tense and past participle said)
A1 to speak words decir ‘I’d like to go home,’ she said. How do you say this word?
B1 to tell someone about a fact or opinion decir He said that he was leaving.
B1 to give information in writing, numbers, or signs poner My watch says one o’clock.
B1 to think or believe decir, suponer People say that he’s over 100.
it goes without saying
If something goes without saying, it is obvious or generally accepted. huelga decir It goes without saying that smoking is harmful.
(Definition of say from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

say

verb /sei/ ( 3rd person singular present tense says /sez/, past tense, past participle said /sed/)
to speak or utter decir What did you say? She said ’Yes’.
to tell, state or declare decir She said how she had enjoyed meeting me She is said to be very beautiful.
to repeat decir The child says her prayers every night.
to guess or estimate decir I can’t say when he’ll return.
saying noun
something often said, especially a proverb etc dicho a well-known saying.
have (something, nothing etc) to say for oneself
to be able/unable to explain one’s actions etc guardarse una carta en la manga Your work is very careless – what have you to say for yourself?
I wouldn’t say no to
I would like no diré que no a I wouldn’t say no to an ice-cream.
(let’s) say
roughly; approximately; about digamos You’ll arrive there in, (let’s) say, three hours.
say the word
I’m ready to obey your wishes sólo tienes que dedirlo If you’d like to go with me, say the word.
that is to say
in other words; I mean es decir He was here last Thursday, that’s to say the 4th of June.
(Definition of say from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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