secure translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "secure" - English-Spanish dictionary

secure

adjective /siˈkjuə/
(often with againstor from) safe; free from danger, loss etc
seguro
Is your house secure against burglary? He went on holiday, secure in the knowledge that he had done well in the exam.
firm, fastened, or fixed
firme
Is that door secure?
definite; not likely to be lost
seguro
She has had a secure offer of a job He has a secure job.
securely adverb
firmemente
Make sure that you tie the knot securely.
security noun the state of being, or making safe, secure, free from danger etc
seguridad
the security of a happy home This alarm system will give the factory some security There has to be tight security at a prison (also adjective) the security forces a security guard.
security risk noun a person considered not safe to be given a job involving knowledge of secrets because he/she might give secret information to an enemy etc
riesgo para la seguridad
He was considered a security risk because of his links to two extremists.
(Definition of secure from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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