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Spanish translation of “serve”

serve

verb /səːv/
to work for a person etc, eg as a servant
servir
He served his master for forty years.
to distribute food etc or supply goods
servir
She served the soup to the guests Which shop assistant served you (with these goods)?
to be suitable for a purpose
servir (de)
This upturned bucket will serve as a seat.
to perform duties, eg as a member of the armed forces
servir, prestar servicio
He served (his country) as a soldier for twenty years I served on the committee for five years.
to undergo (a prison sentence)
cumplir
He served (a sentence of) six years for armed robbery.
in tennis and similar games, to start the play by throwing up the ball etc and hitting it
sacar
He served the ball into the net Is it your turn to serve?
server noun (usually in plural) a utensil used in serving food
cubierto de servir
salad servers.
a person who serves (a ball).
camarero, mesero
serving noun a portion of food served
porción, ración
I had two servings of pie.
it serves you etc right you etc deserve your misfortune etc
tenerlo bien merecido
He has done no work so it will serve him right if he fails his exam.
serve an apprenticeship to spend a (fixed) period of time as an apprentice.
hacer el aprendizaje
serve out phrasal verb to distribute to each of a number of people
servir
She served out the pudding.
serve up phrasal verb to start serving (a meal)
servir, ofrecer
Please could you lay the table – I’m about to serve up.
(Definition of serve from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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