shame translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Translation of "shame" - English-Spanish dictionary

See all translations

shame

noun /ʃeim/
(often with at) an unpleasant feeling caused by awareness of guilt, fault, foolishness or failure
vergüenza, pena
I was full of shame at my rudeness He felt no shame at his behaviour/behavior.
dishonour/dishonor or disgrace
deshonra
The news that he had accepted bribes brought shame on his whole family.
(with a) a cause of disgrace or a matter for blame
vergüenza
It’s a shame to treat a child so cruelly.
(with a) a pity
pena, lástima
What a shame that he didn’t get the job!
shameful adjective disgraceful
vergonzoso
shameful behaviour/behavior.
shamefully adverb
vergonzosamente
a shamefully poor performance.
shamefulness noun
vergüenza, deshonra
shameless adjective without shame; blatant
desvergonzado, sinvergüenza
a shameless liar shameless deception.
not modest
descarado
a shameless woman.
shamelessly adverb
descaradamente
shamelessness noun
descaro
shamefaced adjective showing shame or embarrassment
avergonzado, apenado
He was very shamefaced about his mistake.
put to shame to make feel ashamed of something or to make seem to be of poor quality by showing greater excellence
dejar a alguien en evidencia
Your beautiful drawing puts me/mine to shame.
to my/his etc shame it is a cause of shame to me, him etc that
para mi vergüenza
To my shame, my daughter always beats me at chess.
(Definition of shame from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

More translations of “shame” in Spanish

Definitions of “shame” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day
stretch the truth

to say something that is not completely honest in order to make someone or something seem better than it really is

Word of the Day

July 4th, Bastille Day, and the language of revolution.
July 4th, Bastille Day, and the language of revolution.
by Liz Walter,
July 01, 2015
With the USA’s Independence Day on the 4th and France’s Bastille Day on the 14th, July certainly has a revolutionary theme, so this blog looks at words and phrases we use to talk about the dramatic and nation-changing events that these days celebrate. In particular, it focuses on one of the most

Read More 

generation pause noun
generation pause noun
July 06, 2015
informal young adults who are not able to do things previously typical for their age group such as buy a home or start a family because of lack of money Meanwhile, a new study released last week revealed a quarter of Brits believe they’ll never own a property, leading them to be

Read More