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Spanish translation of “sign”

sign

noun /sain/
a mark used to mean something; a symbol
señal
+ is the sign for addition.
a notice set up to give information (a shopkeeper’s name, the direction of a town etc) to the public
señal, panel, letrero
a road sign.
a movement (eg a nod, wave of the hand) used to mean or represent something
gesto, seña
He made a sign to me to keep still.
a piece of evidence suggesting that something is present or about to come
signo
There were no signs of life at the house and he was afraid they were away Clouds are often a sign of rain.
signboard noun a board with a notice
letrero, cartelera
In the garden was a signboard which read ’House for Sale’.
sign language noun a system of communicating with people who cannot hear by using hand signals rather than spoken words.
Idioma de Signos
She communicates in sign language.
signpost noun a post with a sign on it, showing the direction and distance of places
poste indicador
We saw a signpost which told us we were 80 kilometres from London.
sign in phrasal verb ( sign out) to record one’s arrival or departure by writing one’s name
firmar el registro, registrarse
He signed in at the hotel when he arrived.
sign up phrasal verb to join an organization or make an agreement to do something etc by writing one’s name
inscribirse, matricularse
He signed up for the darts competition.
to engage for work by making a legal contract.
contratar
(Definition of sign from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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