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Spanish translation of “single”

single

adjective /ˈsiŋɡl/
one only
solo, único
The spider hung on a single thread.
for one person only a single bed/mattress. unmarried
soltero
a single person.
for or in one direction only
de ida, sencillo
a single ticket/journey/fare.
singleness noun
resolución, determinación, soltería
singles noun plural (also noun singular ) in tennis etc, a match or matches with only one player on each side The men’s singles are being played this week (also adjective) a singles match. unmarried (usually young) people
solteros
a bar for singles (also adjective) a singles holiday/club.
singly adverb one by one; separately
por separado, uno por uno
They came all together, but they left singly.
single-breasted adjective (of a coat, jacket etc) having only one row of buttons
recto, sin cruzar
a single-breasted tweed suit.
single-decker noun, adjective (a bus etc) having only one deck or level
autobús de un solo piso
a single-decker (bus).
single-handed adjective, adverb working etc by oneself, without help
sin ayuda
He runs the restaurant single-handed a single-handed effort.
single parent noun a mother or father who brings up a child or children on her or his own
padre soltero; madre soltera
(also adjective) a single-parent family.
single out phrasal verb to choose or pick out for special treatment
escoger, seleccionar
He was singled out to receive special thanks for his help.
(Definition of single from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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