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Spanish translation of “sky”

sky

noun /skai/ (plural skies, often with the)
the part of space above the earth, in which the sun, moon etc can be seen; the heavens
cielo
The sky was blue and cloudless We had grey skies and rain throughout our holiday The skies were grey all week.
sky-blue adjective, noun (of) the light blue colour/color of cloudless sky
azul celeste
She wore a sky-blue dress.
sky-diving noun the sport of jumping from aircraft and waiting for some time before opening one’s parachute.
caída libre, paracaídismo acrobático
sky-diver noun
paracaídista de caída libre
sky-high adverb, adjective very high
por las nubes, por las aires
The car was blown sky-high by the explosion sky-high prices.
skyjack verb to hijack a plane
atracar
The terrorists attempted to skyjack the plane at Athens airport.
skyjacker noun
atracador
skylight noun a window in a roof or ceiling
claraboya, tragaluz
The attic had only a small skylight and was very dark.
skyline noun the outline of buildings, hills etc seen against the sky
horizonte
the New York skyline I could see something moving on the skyline.
skyrocket verb to rise sharply; to increase rapidly and suddenly
dispararse
Housing prices have skyrocketed.
skyrocket noun a rocket firework that explodes in brilliant colourful/colorful sparks.
fuegos artificiales
skyscraper noun a high building of very many storeys/stories, especially in the United States.
rascacielos
the sky’s the limit there is no upper limit eg to the amount of money that may be spent
todo es posible
Choose any present you like – the sky’s the limit!
(Definition of sky from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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