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Spanish translation of “special”

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special

adjective /ˈspeʃəl/
out of the ordinary; unusual or exceptional
especial, extraordinario
a special occasion a special friend.
appointed, arranged, designed etc for a particular purpose
específico, particular
a special messenger a special tool for drilling holes.
specialist noun a person who makes a very deep study of one branch of a subject or field
especialista
Dr Brown is a heart specialist.
speciality noun ( plural specialities, specialties) ( specialty) a special product for which one is well-known
especialidad
Brown bread is this baker’s speciality.
a special activity, or subject about which one has special knowledge
especialidad
His speciality is physics.
specialize verb ( (also specialiseBritish)) (usually with in) go give one’s attention (to), work (in), or study (a particular job, subject etc)
especializarse
He specializes in fixing computers.
specialization noun ( (also specialisationBritish))
especialidad
Her specialization is obstetrics.
specialized adjective ( (also specialisedBritish)) (of knowledge, skills etc) of the accurate detailed kind obtained by specializing
especializado
You need specialized knowledge and training to do this job.
specially adverb with one particular purpose
especialmente
I picked these flowers specially for you a splendid cake, specially made for the occasion.
particularly; exceptionally
particularmente
He’s a nice child, but not specially clever.
special needs noun plural the needs of people who have mental or physical disabilities
Necesidades Especiales
a school for children with special needs.
(Definition of special from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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