sponge - translate into Spanish with the English-Spanish dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Spanish translation of “sponge”

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sponge

noun /spandʒ/
a type of sea animal, or its soft skeleton, which has many holes and is able to suck up and hold water.
esponja
a piece of such a skeleton or a substitute, used for washing the body etc.
esponja
a sponge pudding or cake
bizcocho
We had jam sponge for dessert.
an act of wiping etc with a sponge
pasada de esponja
Give the table a quick sponge over, will you?
sponger noun a person who lives by sponging on others
gorrón
She’s such a sponger -she’s always borrowing things from other people.
spongy adjective soft and springy or holding water like a sponge
esponjoso
spongy ground.
spongily adverb
de manera esponjosa
sponginess noun
esponjosidad
sponge bag noun a small bag for carrying the things you need to wash with such as soap, a toothbrush etc.
Bolsa de Aseo
sponge cake noun ( sponge pudding) (a) very light cake or pudding made from flour, eggs and sugar etc.
bizcocho
(Definition of sponge from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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