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Translation of "sport" - English-Spanish dictionary

sport

noun /spoːt/
games or competitions involving physical activity deporte She’s very keen on sport of all kinds. a particular game or amusement of this kind deporte Hunting, shooting and fishing are not sports I enjoy. a good-natured and obliging person buena persona He’s a good sport to agree to do that for us! fun; amusement diversión I only did it for sport. sporting adjective of, or concerned with, sports deportivo the sporting world. (opposite unsporting) showing fairness and kindness or generosity, especially if unexpected caballeroso a sporting gesture. sports adjective (American also sport) designed, or suitable, for sport deportivo a sports centre sports equipment. sporty adjective ( comparative sportier, superlative sportiest) (especially British) (of a person) liking or good at sport; athletic Deportivo She’s quite a sporty person. (of clothes) attractive in a bright informal way Interesante a sporty jacket. Deportivo (of a car) fast, elegant, and expensive. sports car noun a small, fast car with only two seats. coche deportivo sports jacket noun a type of jacket for men, designed for casual wear. chaqueta de sport sportsman /ˈspoːts-/ noun ( feminine sportswoman, plural sportsmen, sportswomen) a person who takes part in sports deportista He is a very keen sportsman. a person who shows a spirit of fairness and generosity in sport buen jugador; buena jugadora He’s a real sportsman who doesn’t seem to care if he wins or loses. sportswear noun clothing designed for playing sports in. trajes de sport a sporting chance noun a reasonably good chance bastantes posibilidades She definitely has a sporting chance of winning the race.
(Definition of sport from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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