stress translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary

Translation of "stress" - English-Spanish dictionary


noun /stres/
the worry experienced by a person in particular circumstances, or the state of anxiety caused by this
tensión, estrés
the stresses of modern life Her headaches may be caused by stress.
force exerted by (parts of) bodies on each other
Bridge-designers have to know about stress.
force or emphasis placed, in speaking, on particular syllables or words
énfasis, acento
In the word ’widow’ we put stress on the first syllable.
stressed adjective too worried and tired to be able to relax
I always feel rather stressed when I have to give a speech.
(linguistics) (of a word or syllable) pronounced with emphasis
In the word ‘later’, the first syllable is stressed.
stressful adjective causing a lot of anxiety
a stressful job.
stress mark noun (linguistics ) a mark used to show where the stress comes in a word etc
lay/put stress on to emphasize (a fact etc)
He laid stress on this point.
(Definition of stress from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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