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Spanish translation of “such”

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such

adjective /satʃ/
of the same kind as that already mentioned or being mentioned
tal(es), así, semejante, de este tipo
Animals that gnaw, such as mice, rats, rabbits and weasels are called rodents He came from Bradford or some such place She asked to see Mr Johnson but was told there was no such person there I’ve seen several such buildings I’ve never done such a thing before doctors, dentists and such people.
of the great degree already mentioned or being mentioned
tal; así de (malos, etc)
If you had telephoned her, she wouldn’t have got into such a state of anxiety She never used to get such bad headaches (as she does now).
of the great degree, or the kind, to have a particular result
tal; tan/tanto
He shut the window with such force that the glass broke She’s such a good teacher that the headmaster asked her not to leave Their problems are such as to make it impossible for them to live together any more.
used for emphasis
tal, tan
This is such a shock! They have been such good friends to me!
suchlike adjective, pronoun (things) of the same kind
de ese tipo
I don’t like books about love, romance and suchlike (things).
such-and-such adjective, pronoun used to refer to some unnamed person or thing
tal y tal, tal y cual
Let’s suppose that you go into such-and-such a shop and ask for such-and-such.
such as it is though it scarcely deserves the name
si se le puede llamar así
You can borrow our lawn mower, such as it is.
Translations of “such”
in French tel, pareil, semblable…
in German solch, derartig…
(Definition of such from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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