sudden translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "sudden" - English-Spanish dictionary

sudden

adjective /ˈsadn/
happening etc quickly and unexpectedly
súbito, repentino
a sudden attack His decision to get married is rather sudden! a sudden bend in the road.
suddenness noun
cualidad de repentino/súbito; brusquedad
The suddenness of his decision to resign surprised everyone.
suddenly adverb
súbitamente, de repente, de golpe
He suddenly woke up Suddenly she realized that the stranger had a gun.
all of a sudden suddenly or unexpectedly
de repente, de golpe
All of a sudden the lights went out.
Translations of “sudden”
in Arabic مُفاجىء…
in Korean 갑작스런…
in Malaysian tiba-tiba…
in French soudain…
in Turkish ani, beklenmedik, apansız…
in Italian improvviso…
in Chinese (Traditional) 突然的,忽然的, 意外的…
in Russian внезапный…
in Polish nagły, gwałtowny…
in Vietnamese thình lình…
in Portuguese repentino, súbito…
in Thai ทันทีทันใด…
in German plötzlich…
in Catalan sobtat, inesperat…
in Japanese 突然の, 急な…
in Indonesian mendadak…
in Chinese (Simplified) 突然的,忽然的, 意外的…
(Definition of sudden from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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