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Spanish translation of “suit”

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suit

noun /suːt/
a set of clothes usually all of the same cloth etc , made to be worn together, eg a jacket, trousers (and waistcoat) for a man, or a jacket and skirt or trousers for a woman
traje
a tailored suit.
a piece of clothing for a particular purpose
traje (de baño, etc)
a bathing suit / diving suit.
a case in a law court
pleito, juicio
He won/lost his suit.
an old word for a formal request, eg a proposal of marriage to a lady.
petición de mano, propuesta/oferta de matrimonio
one of the four sets of playing-cards – spades, hearts, diamonds, clubs.
palo
suited adjective (opposite unsuited) fitted, or appropriate (to or for)
(estar) hecho para, adecuado
I don’t think he’s suited to/for this work.
suitor noun an old word for a man who tries to gain the love of a woman
pretendiente
She had a number of suitors vying for her attention.
suitcase noun a case with flat sides for clothes etc, used by a person when travelling
maleta
He hastily packed his (clothes in his) suitcase.
follow suit to do just as someone else has done
hacer lo mismo (que otra persona), seguir el ejemplo(de otra persona)
He went to bed and I followed suit.
suit down to the ground (of eg an arrangement, fashion etc) to suit (a person) completely
ir de perlas, venir de perilla; ir/quedar como un guante, quedar que ni pintado
The dress suits her down to the ground.
suit oneself to do what one wants to do
hacer lo que a uno le apetece/le viene en gana/le da la gana
’Do you want to come with us to the beach?’ ’No, thanks.’ ’Oh well, suit yourself!’
(Definition of suit from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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