term translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "term" - English-Spanish dictionary

term

noun /təːm/
a ( usually limited) period of time
período, etapa
a term of imprisonment a term of office.
a division of a school or university year
trimestre (tres meses); cuatrimestre (cuatro meses); semestre (seis meses)
the autumn term.
a word or expression
término
Myopia is a medical term for short-sightedness.
terms noun plural the rules or conditions of an agreement or bargain
condiciones
They had a meeting to arrange terms for an agreement.
fixed charges (for work, service etc)
condiciones
The firms sent us a list of their terms.
a relationship between people
relaciones
They are on bad/friendly terms.
come to terms to reach an agreement or understanding
llegar a un acuerdo/arreglo/entendimiento
They came to terms with the enemy.
to find a way of living with or tolerating (some personal trouble or difficulty)
aprender a vivir con algo, aceptar; adaptarse
He managed to come to terms with his illness.
in terms of using as a means of expression, a means of assessing value etc
desde el punto de vista de, en función de
He thought of everything in terms of money.
(Definition of term from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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