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Spanish translation of “terror”

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terror

noun /ˈterə/
very great fear
terror, pavor
She screamed with/in terror She has a terror of spiders.
something which makes one very afraid
terror, horror
The terrors of war.
a troublesome person, especially a child
diablillo
That child is a real terror!
terrorism noun the actions or methods of terrorists
terrorismo
international terrorism.
terrorist noun a person who tries to frighten people or governments into doing what he/she wants by using or threatening violence
terrorista
The plane was hijacked by terrorists ( also adjective) terrorist activities.
terrorize verb ( ( also terroriseBritish)) to make very frightened by using or threatening violence
aterrorizar, atemorizar
A lion escaped from the zoo and terrorized the whole town.
terrorization noun ( ( also terrorisationBritish))
terror
terror-stricken adjective feeling very great fear
aterrorizado, atemorizado
The children were terror-stricken.
Translations of “terror”
in Korean 공포심…
in Arabic رُعْب…
in French terreur…
in Italian terrore…
in Chinese (Traditional) (暴行引起的)恐懼,驚駭, 討厭鬼(尤指小孩)…
in Russian ужас…
in Turkish terör, dehşet…
in Polish przerażenie…
in Portuguese terror…
in German das Entsetzen, der Schrecken, die Plage…
in Catalan terror…
in Japanese 恐怖, 恐れ…
in Chinese (Simplified) (暴行引起的)恐惧,惊骇, 讨厌鬼(尤指小孩)…
(Definition of terror from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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