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Spanish translation of “the”

the

definite article /ðə, ði/
(The form /ðə is used before words beginning with a consonant eg the house , ðəhaus or consonant sound eg the union , ðəˈjuːnjən; the form , ði is used before words beginning with a vowel eg the apple , ði ˈapl or vowel sound eg the honour , ði ˈonə /)
el, la, los, las
used to refer to a person, thing etc mentioned previously, described in a following phrase, or already known
El, Ella, Ellos, Ellas
Where is the book I put on the table? Who was the man you were talking to? My mug is the tall blue one Switch the light off!
used with a singular noun or an adjective to refer to all members of a group etc or to a general type of object, group of objects etc
el, la
The horse is running fast. I spoke to him on the telephone He plays the piano/violin very well.
used to refer to unique objects etc, especially in titles and names
el, la
the Duke of Edinburgh the Atlantic (Ocean).
used after a preposition with words referring to a unit of quantity, time etc
el, la, los, las
In this job we are paid by the hour.
used with superlative adjectives and adverbs to denote a person, thing etc which is or shows more of something than any other
el, la, los, las
He is the kindest man I know We like him (the) best of all.
( often with all) used with comparative adjectives to show that a person, thing etc is better, worse etc
mucho
He has had a week’s holiday and looks (all) the better for it.
the … the … ( with comparative adjective or adverb ) used to show the connection or relationship between two actions, states, processes etc
cuanto más … más
The harder you work, the more you earn.
(Definition of the from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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