Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Spanish translation of “tight”

See all translations

tight

adjective /tait/
fitting very or too closely
apretado; estrecho
I couldn’t open the box because the lid was too tight My trousers are too tight.
stretched to a great extent; not loose
apretado
He made sure that the ropes were tight.
(of control etc) strict and very careful
riguroso, estricto
She keeps (a) tight control over her emotions.
not allowing much time
apretado
We hope to finish this next week but the schedule’s a bit tight.
-tight suffix sealed so as to keep (something) in or out, as in airtight, watertight
hermético
tighten verb to make or become tight or tighter
apretar; tensar; cerrar herméticamente
He tightened his grip on her hand.
tightness noun
cualidad de apretado/hermético; carácter riguroso
the tightness of his trousers.
tights noun plural ( British ) a close-fitting ( usually nylon or woollen) garment covering the feet, legs and body to the waist; pantyhose( American)
medias
She bought three pairs of tights.
tight-fisted adjective mean and ungenerous with money
tacaño, agarrado
a tight-fisted employer.
tightrope noun a tightly-stretched rope or wire on which acrobats balance.
cuerda floja
a tight corner/spot noun a difficult position or situation
en un aprieto, entre la espada y la pared
His refusal to help put her in a tight corner/spot.
tighten one’s belt to make sacrifices and reduce one’s standard of living
apretar(se) el cinturón
If the economy gets worse, we shall just have to tighten our belts.
(Definition of tight from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

More translations of “tight” in Spanish

Definitions of “tight” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

glacial

made or left by a glacier

Word of the Day

Let’s celebrate! (words and phrases for parties)

by Kate Woodford,
December 17, 2014
​​​ With Christmas and New Year almost upon us, we thought it a good time to look at the language of parties and celebrations. First, let’s start with the word ‘party’ itself. To have or throw a party or, less commonly, to give a party is to arrange a party: We’re having a

Read More 

cinderella surgery noun

December 15, 2014
cosmetic surgery to the feet We have all heard of people having nose jobs, boob jobs and liposuction – but now a new trend growing in popularity in America: Cinderella surgery.

Read More