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Spanish translation of “tight”

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tight

adjective /tait/
fitting very or too closely
apretado; estrecho
I couldn’t open the box because the lid was too tight My trousers are too tight.
stretched to a great extent; not loose
apretado
He made sure that the ropes were tight.
(of control etc) strict and very careful
riguroso, estricto
She keeps (a) tight control over her emotions.
not allowing much time
apretado
We hope to finish this next week but the schedule’s a bit tight.
-tight suffix sealed so as to keep (something) in or out, as in airtight, watertight
hermético
tighten verb to make or become tight or tighter
apretar; tensar; cerrar herméticamente
He tightened his grip on her hand.
tightness noun
cualidad de apretado/hermético; carácter riguroso
the tightness of his trousers.
tights noun plural ( British ) a close-fitting ( usually nylon or woollen) garment covering the feet, legs and body to the waist; pantyhose( American)
medias
She bought three pairs of tights.
tight-fisted adjective mean and ungenerous with money
tacaño, agarrado
a tight-fisted employer.
tightrope noun a tightly-stretched rope or wire on which acrobats balance.
cuerda floja
a tight corner/spot noun a difficult position or situation
en un aprieto, entre la espada y la pared
His refusal to help put her in a tight corner/spot.
tighten one’s belt to make sacrifices and reduce one’s standard of living
apretar(se) el cinturón
If the economy gets worse, we shall just have to tighten our belts.
(Definition of tight from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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