trim translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "trim" - English-Spanish dictionary

trim

verb /trim/ ( past tense, past participle trimmed)
to cut the edges or ends of (something) in order to make it shorter and/or neat
cortar, recortar; arreglar; (jardinería) podar
He’s trimming the hedge She had her hair trimmed.
to decorate (a dress, hat etc, usually round the edges)
adornar, guarnecer
She trimmed the sleeves with lace.
to arrange (the sails of a boat etc) suitably for the weather conditions
orientar
Frank trimmed the sails and the boat surged ahead.
trimly adverb
con arreglo/aseo/cuidado
trimness noun
aspecto arreglado/aseado/cuidado
trimming noun something added as a decoration
adorno, guarnición
lace trimming.
( usually in plural) a piece cut off; an end or edge
recorte
meat trimmings.
in (good) trim in good condition
en buena forma
Her figure’s in good trim after all those exercises.
(Definition of trim from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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