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Translation of "visual" - English-Spanish dictionary

visual

adjective   /ˈvɪʒ·u·əl/
relating to seeing visual The movie has dramatic visual effects. I have a strong visual imagination.
(Definition of visual from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

visual

adjective /ˈviʒuəl/
of sight or the process of seeing visual the visual arts The film makes use of a variety of spectacular visual effects.
visualize verb ( (also visualiseBritish))
to form a picture of someone or something in your mind visualizar, imaginar These models let forecasters visualize how the storm is forming and what direction it will move.
visualization noun ( (also visualisationBritish))
visualización the application of high-end computers for the visualization of weather patterns.
visually adverb
visualmente Visually, the movie is stunning.
visual display unit noun
(abbreviation VDU) (computing) the part of a computer with a screen on which information is displayed. unidad de presentación visual, unidad de visualización, pantalla
(Definition of visual from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Translations of “visual”
in Korean 시각의…
in Arabic مَرئي…
in Malaysian penglihatan…
in French visuel…
in Russian зрительный, визуальный…
in Chinese (Traditional) 視覺的, 視力的…
in Italian visivo…
in Turkish görsel…
in Polish wzrokowy, wizualny…
in Vietnamese có liên quan đến thị giác…
in Portuguese visual…
in Thai เกี่ยวกับการมองเห็น…
in German visuell…
in Catalan visual…
in Japanese 視覚の…
in Chinese (Simplified) 视觉的, 视力的…
in Indonesian penglihatan…
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