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Spanish translation of “waste”

waste

verb /weist/
to fail to use (something) fully or in the correct or most useful way
desperdiciar, malgastar
You’re wasting my time with all these stupid questions.
wastage /-tidʒ/ noun loss by wasting; the amount wasted
desperdicio, pérdida; despilfarro
We’re trying to minimize the amount of wastage during the production process.
wasteful adjective involving or causing waste
derrochador, despilfarrador
Throwing away that bread is wasteful.
wastefully adverb
derrochadoramente, despilfarradoramente
Supermarkets wastefully throw away a lot of unsold food.
wastefulness noun
desperdicio; derroche, despilfarro
wastebasket (American ) a small open container for waste paper and other rubbish; wastepaper basket (British)
basurero
waste paper noun paper which is thrown away as not being useful
papeles usados, papel desechado
All our waste paper is recycled.
wastepaper basket /ˈweispeipə/ noun (British ) a basket or other (small) container for waste paper; wastebasket (American)
papelera
Put those old letters in the wastepaper basket.
waste pipe /ˈweispaip/ noun a pipe to carry off waste material, or water from a sink etc
desagüe
The kitchen waste pipe is blocked.
wastewater /ˈweistˌwoːtə/ noun water mixed with waste matter that has been used in homes, factories etc
agua residual
The wastewater is pumped to the treatment plant.
waste away phrasal verb to decay; to lose weight, strength and health etc
consumirse, demacrarse
He is wasting away because of the disease.
(Definition of waste from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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