wire translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "wire" - English-Spanish dictionary

wire

noun /ˈwaiə/
(also adjective) (of) metal drawn out into a long strand, as thick as string or as thin as thread
alambre, cable, hilo
We need some wire to connect the battery to the rest of the circuit a wire fence.
a single strand of this
hilo
There must be a loose wire in my radio somewhere.
the metal cable used in telegraphy
telégrafo
The message came over the wire this morning.
a telegram
telegrama
Send me a wire if I’m needed urgently.
wireless noun an older word for (a) radio. wiring noun the (system of) wires used in connecting up a circuit etc.
alambrado
high wire noun a high tightrope
cuerda floja
acrobats on the high wire.
wire-netting noun a material with wide mesh woven of wire, used in fencing etc
red de alambre, tela metálica
He covered the strawberry plants with wire-netting to prevent the birds from getting at the fruit.
(Definition of wire from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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