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Spanish translation of “wise”

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wise

adjective /waiz/
having gained a great deal of knowledge from books or experience or both and able to use it well.
sabio
sensible
sensato, juicioso
You would be wise to do as he suggests a wise decision.
wisely adverb
sabiamente, sensatamente
She wisely decided not to marry him.
wisdom /ˈwizdəm/ noun
sabiduría
Wisdom comes with experience.
wisdom tooth /ˈwizdəm-/ noun (anatomy ) any one of the four back teeth cut after childhood, usually about the age of twenty.
muela del juicio
wisecrack noun a joke
salida
He sat at the back of the class and made wisecracks.
wise guy noun (informal ) a person who (shows that he) thinks that he is smart, knows everything etc.
sabelotodo
be wise to to be fully aware of
ser consciente de
He thinks I’m going to give him some money, but I’m wise to his plan.
none the wiser not knowing any more than before
seguir sin entender, no darse cuenta, no enterarse
He tried to explain the rules to me, but I’m none the wiser.
put (someone) wise to tell, inform (someone) of the real facts.
poner (a alguien) al tanto/corriente
Translations of “wise”
in Korean 지혜로운…
in Arabic حَكيم…
in French sage, (bien) avisé…
in Italian saggio…
in Chinese (Traditional) 明智的, 英明的, 聰明的…
in Russian разумный, мудрый…
in Turkish akıllı, makul…
in Polish mądry, rozsądny…
in Portuguese sábio, sensato, prudente…
in German weise, klug…
in Catalan savi, assenyat…
in Japanese 賢明な, 賢い…
in Chinese (Simplified) 明智的, 英明的, 聪明的…
(Definition of wise from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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