absorb Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “absorb” in the English Dictionary

"absorb" in British English

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absorbverb [T]

uk   /əbˈzɔːb/  us   /-ˈzɔːrb/

absorb verb [T] (TAKE IN)

B2 to take something in, ​especiallygradually: Plants absorb ​carbondioxide. In ​coldclimates, ​houses need to have ​walls that will absorb ​heat. Towels absorb ​moisture. The ​drug is ​quickly absorbed into the ​bloodstream. Our ​countryside is ​increasingly being absorbed by/into the ​largecities. to ​reduce the ​effect of a ​physicalforce, ​shock, or ​change: The ​barrier absorbed the ​mainimpact of the ​crash.
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absorb verb [T] (UNDERSTAND)

C1 to ​understandfacts or ​ideascompletely and ​remember them: It's hard to absorb so much ​information.

absorb verb [T] (INTEREST VERY MUCH)

B2 to take up someone's ​attentioncompletely: The ​project has absorbed her for several ​years.
Synonym

absorb verb [T] (PAY)

if a ​business absorbs the ​cost of something, it ​pays that ​costeasily: The ​school has absorbed most of the ​expenses so ​far, but it may have to ​offer fewer ​places next ​year to ​reducecosts.

absorb verb [T] (TAKE CONTROL)

if one ​company absorbs another ​company, it ​takescontrol of it and they ​become one ​company: Telecorp Holdings absorbed ​itsSpanishsubsidiary into ​its British ​headquarters.
(Definition of absorb from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"absorb" in American English

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absorbverb [T]

 us   /əbˈzɔrb, -ˈsɔrb/

absorb verb [T] (SUCK IN)

to take in a ​liquid, ​gas, or ​chemical: The ​blackclaysoil around here doesn’t absorb ​water very well. fig. The ​country has absorbed millions of ​immigrants over the ​years. Note: Used to describe the behavior of a substance or object.

absorb verb [T] (TAKE ATTENTION)

to ​completely take the ​attention of someone: She was absorbed in ​listening to ​music. To absorb ​knowledge, ​ideas, or ​information is to ​understand them ​completely and ​store them in ​yourmemory: It was ​difficult to absorb so much ​information.
(Definition of absorb from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"absorb" in Business English

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absorbverb [T]

uk   us   /əbˈzɔːb/
if an ​organization absorbs the ​cost of something, it ​pays that ​cost: The ​law school has absorbed most of the ​expenses so far, but it may have to ​offer fewer ​places next ​year to ​reducecosts.
FINANCE if one ​company absorbs another ​company in a takeover, they become one ​company: Telecorp ​Holdings absorbed its Spanish ​subsidiary, Digital Corporation, into its British ​headquarters.
(Definition of absorb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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