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Meaning of “abstract” in the English Dictionary

"abstract" in British English

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abstractadjective

uk   /ˈæb.strækt/  us   /ˈæb.strækt/
  • abstract adjective (GENERAL)

B2 existing as an ​idea, ​feeling, or ​quality, not as a ​materialobject: Truth and ​beauty are abstract ​concepts.
An abstract ​argument or ​discussion is ​general and not ​based on ​particularexamples: This ​debate is ​becoming too abstract - let's have some hard ​facts!
the abstract
generalideas: I have ​difficultydealing with the abstract - let's ​discussparticularcases. So ​far we've only ​discussed the ​question in the abstract (= without referring to any ​realexamples).

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  • abstract adjective (ART)

B2 used to refer to a ​type of ​painting, ​drawing, or sculpture that uses ​shapes, ​lines, and ​colour in a way that does not ​try to ​represent the ​appearance of ​people or things: abstract ​art an abstract ​painter

abstractnoun [C]

uk   /ˈæb.strækt/  us   /ˈæb.strækt/
  • abstract noun [C] (SHORT DOCUMENT)

a ​shortform of a ​speech, ​article, ​book, etc., giving only the most ​importantfacts or ​ideas: There is a ​section at the end of the ​magazine that ​includes abstracts ofrecentarticles/​books.
(Definition of abstract from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"abstract" in American English

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abstractadjective

 us   /æbˈstrækt, ˈæb·strækt/
existing as an ​idea, ​feeling, or ​quality, not as a ​materialobject: "Humanity" is an abstract ​idea.
English If a ​statement, ​argument, or ​discussion is abstract, it is ​general and not ​based on ​particularexamples.
art A ​painting, ​drawing, or ​sculpture is ​described as abstract if it ​tries to ​represent the ​qualities of ​objects or ​people but does not show ​theirouterappearance: abstract ​art

abstractnoun [C]

 us   /ˈæb·strækt/
writing a few ​sentences that give the ​mainideas in an ​article or a ​scientificpaper
(Definition of abstract from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"abstract" in Business English

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abstractadjective

uk   us   /ˈæbstrækt/
existing as an ​idea, ​feeling, or ​quality, not as a ​materialobject: "Satisfaction" is difficult to ​measure as it is an abstract ​concept.

abstractnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈæbstrækt/
a shortened ​form of a speech, ​article, ​book, etc., giving the most important facts or ​ideas: There is a ​section at the end of the ​magazine which ​includes abstracts of recent ​articles.
(Definition of abstract from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“abstract” in American English

“abstract” in Business English

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There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
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