accept Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “accept” in the English Dictionary

"accept" in British English

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acceptverb

uk   us   /əkˈsept/

accept verb (TAKE)

B1 [T] to ​agree to take something: Do you accept ​creditcards? She was in Mumbai to accept an ​award for her ​latestnovel. I ​offered her an ​apology, but she wouldn't accept it. I accept ​fullresponsibility for the ​failure of the ​plan. The new ​coffeemachines will accept ​coins of any ​denomination.B1 [I or T] to say yes to an ​offer or ​invitation: We've ​offered her the ​job, but I don't ​know whether she'll accept it. I've just accepted an ​invitation to the opening-night ​party. I've been ​invited to ​theirwedding but I haven't ​decided whether to accept.
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accept verb (APPROVE)

B2 [T] to ​consider something or someone as ​satisfactory: The ​manuscript was accepted forpublication last ​week. She was accepted as a ​fullmember of the ​society. His ​fellowworkersrefused to accept him (= to ​include him as one of ​theirgroup).
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accept verb (BELIEVE)

B2 [T] to ​believe that something is ​true: The ​policerefused to accept her ​version of the ​story. He still hasn't accepted the ​situation (= ​realized that he cannot ​change it). [+ that] I can't accept that there's nothing we can do.
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(Definition of accept from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"accept" in American English

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acceptverb [T]

 us   /ɪkˈsept, æk-/
to ​agree to take something, or to ​consider something as ​satisfactory, ​reasonable, or ​true: She accepted the ​joboffer. He was ​accused of accepting ​bribes. Do you accept ​creditcards? He ​refuses to accept the ​fact that he could be ​wrong. If you accept an ​offer or an ​invitation, you say yes to it: We accepted an ​invitation to ​visit China. To accept is also to ​allow someone to ​become a ​member of an ​organization or ​group: He was accepted by three ​colleges. To accept is also to ​consider someone as now ​belonging to ​yourgroup as an ​equal: She never ​felt accepted by the other ​girls in her ​sorority.
(Definition of accept from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"accept" in Business English

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acceptverb

uk   us   /əkˈsept/
[T] to ​agree to take something: accept a cheque/credit card/cash Do you accept ​creditcards?accept a booking/order Your ​order has been accepted and will be ​processed within 48 ​hours. The ​buyer may ​refuse to accept the ​goods if they do not ​comply with the ​contract. Please accept my apology for our mistake. I acceptfull responsibility for the ​failure of the ​project.
[I or T] to say yes to an ​offer or ​invitation: accept an offer/job/position We've ​offered her the ​job, but I don't know whether she'll accept. Almost 80% of policyholders voted to accept the ​deal. I've accepted an ​invitation to speak at the ​conference.
[T] to consider something or someone as ​satisfactory: accept sb/sth as sth We are pleased to announce that we have been accepted as a ​fullmember of the Association of Consultant Engineers.accept sth for sth The ​design has been accepted for ​production.
[T] INSURANCE to ​agree to ​provideinsurance for something or someone: The decision by ​insurance underwriters to accept the ​riskdemonstrates the ​strength of his ​case.
[T] FINANCE to ​agree to ​pay a bill of ​exchange
(Definition of accept from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“accept” in Business English

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